Science

  • Health News ScienceDaily 1 day 12 hours ago
    • New research published in The Journal of Neuroscience identifies a motor pathway between the forebrain and brainstem that works like a dimmer switch to regulate swimming speed in the sea lamprey a primitive, jawless fish with an eellike body studied by neuroscientists as a model of the vertebrate nervous system.
    • Dysfunction of this pathway, which is likely present in mammals potentially including humans, may contribute to the symptoms of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease.
    • They found that neurons in these regions use the neurotransmitters glutamate and dopamine in parallel to control the speed and frequency of movement, which could enable the animal to fine tune its approach and avoidant behaviors.
    • The MLR is found in all vertebrates in which it has been studied and the PT is similar to a region in mammals called the substantia nigra pars compacta, highlighting the relevance of this model organism for understanding how the nervous system controls movement.
  • Health News ScienceDaily 1 day 12 hours ago
    • Tapping into the public's passion for the ocean environment could be the key to reducing the threats posed to it by plastic pollution, a new report suggests.
    • Plastic pollution is a problem for all in society and while there are solutions out there, they must be socially acceptable as well as economically and technically viable.
    • Using behavioural sciences to understand drivers of human behaviour will therefore help support ongoing initiatives that can look to clean up our environments."
    • In this study, they say ocean plastic pollution poses similar challenges to other environmental threats because the symptoms are often considered remote from the largely landbased causes.
    • Professor Richard Thompson, Director of Plymouth's International Marine Litter Research Unit, was a significant contributor to the UK Government's inquiries into both microplastics and the use of microbeads in cosmetics.
  • Popular Science 1 day 12 hours ago
    • When Apple announces new hardware—especially new iPhones—it bulldozes the rest of the week’s tech news into an internet pit.
    • But, life was going on elsewhere while Tim Cook and the gang were announcing the iPhone X and basking in the endless string of tech blog hot takes that followed.
    • You can also buy film for any vintage Polaroid camera you might have kicking around from when you were a kid.
    • Concept cars aren’t often included in Last Week in Tech because there are typically so many that they could easily dominate the list.
    • Two exGooglers launched a company called Bodega last week and brought the ire of the internet down upon themselves.
  • Popular Science 1 day 12 hours ago
    • There were a few caveats: He ate both white potatoes and sweet ones, and sometimes mixed in soymilk, tomato sauce, salt and herbs.
    • But, overall, he ate potatoes for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.
    • Technically, the traditional white potato contains all the essential amino acids you need to build proteins, repair cells, and fight diseases.
    • But unless you ate 34 sweet potatoes a day, or 84 white potatoes, you would eventually run into a calcium deficiency.
    • You would also need 25 white potatoes a day to get the recommended amount of protein.
  • Health News ScienceDaily 1 day 12 hours ago
    • Among patients who undergo childhood heart surgery for the severe birth defect singleventricle disease, twothirds of survivors require a surgical or catheterbased procedure within 20 years.
    • The study team performed a retrospective review of 773 patients who underwent the Fontan operation at CHOP between 1992 and 2009.
    • Clinicians and researchers were aware of the need for reinterventions in longterm Fontan survivors, but there was little detailed knowledge of reintervention rates until now.
    • "The important message from this work is that, for many patients, the Fontan operation is not the 'final' procedure, as it is sometimes referred to.
    • This also highlights the need for close and careful ongoing followup after the Fontan operation by pediatric cardiologists familiar with potential complications that could befall a Fontan patient," said Glatz.
  • Health News ScienceDaily 1 day 12 hours ago
    • Predicting how climate change will affect the incidence of infectious diseases would have great public health benefits.
    • Instead, researchers need new statistical models that incorporate both climate factors and the climatedisease relationship, accounting for uncertainties in both.
    • Climate change could either increase or decrease the geographic range of the Anopheles mosquitoes that transmit the disease; it could also affect the mosquitoes' lifespans and breeding patterns.
    • As an illustration, take the example of a waterborne disease like typhoid fever.
    • Thus, climate change could increase the incidence of typhoid fever.
  • Popular Science 1 day 13 hours ago
    • Parents often do this because slides can seem especially dangerous for small children struggling with basic coordination.
    • Of those, 94 percent involved lower leg injuries.
    • This is important, because that's not how a kid falling off a slide solo would usually get hurt.
    • If the injury happens while the slide is in progress, hands and faces are still the most logical injury site.
    • You really need to make sure that you're watching and controlling the child's lower extremities so they don't catch on the side of the slide.”
  • Health News ScienceDaily 1 day 13 hours ago
    • Scientists already know that high cigarette prices reduce smoking rates, and that levels of smoking affect infant mortality.
    • Now, for the first time, researchers from Imperial College London have found an association between infant mortality rates and the differences in costs between higher and lower priced cigarettes.
    • The authors say that eliminating budget cigarettes from the market may help to reduce infant deaths globally.
    • The researchers obtained data on cigarette prices over this period and examined whether differences between average priced and budget cigarettes was linked to infant mortality rates.
    • The cost of average priced cigarettes increased during this time in all countries studied.
  • Popular Science 1 day 14 hours ago
    • If you want to take further precautions, or you have one friend or relative who's constantly borrowing your device, try out Android's guest mode.
    • On one of Apple's smartphones, the Guided Access feature can help protect your iPhone from whoever's borrowing it.
    • To set up Guided Access, open Settings and then select General, Accessibility, and Guided Access.
    • If you're going to put a limit on the Guided Access restriction, you can also configure the alarms here.
    • However, if Guided Access doesn't quite work for you, you do get a couple other options that are worth mentioning.
  • Health News ScienceDaily 1 day 14 hours ago
    • The critical size for schoolchildren is roughly a diameter of 40 mm, as a hard sugar ball of this size is still too big to be swallowed.
    • Based on these prior findings, the BfR has now assessed the size at which small hard sugar balls are still large enough that accidental or intentional swallowing can result in blocking of the airways in children from the age of 5.
    • If spherical objects become lodged in this area, this can result in almost complete or total blockage of the airways and therefore to a lifethreatening event.
    • It can be expected that, at this age, spherical objects with a smooth surface up to this size can pass through the anatomic "bottlenecks" in the throat without risk.
    • The BfR has not assessed the risk to younger children resulting from specific sizes of the hard sugar balls.